Smeggy's Forums

Forums where you CAN vent!

Skip to content

What are you reading at the moment?

Like a good read? You're not the only one! Talk about it here!!!

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden



User avatar
Loves Smeggy's
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 10:16 pm

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

Just finished Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephensen. Wasn't particularly impressed with it.

Now on Moab is my Washpot by the legendary Stephen Fry

MartinJ - On a campaign to abolish the rules made of stone.
I know I can't spell for Tofee - I don't need to be reminded!

User avatar
Really Hooked!
Posts: 380
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 6:21 pm
Location: Holmfirth, UK
How Hot Are You?: Frosty Weekend in Rhyl

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

MartinJ wrote:Just finished Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephensen. Wasn't particularly impressed with it.

Now on Moab is my Washpot by the legendary Stephen Fry


Great book, loved it. Then again i am sure he could turn out any old rubbish and i would love it too :oops: He just seems a unique talent, his use of words is amazing.




Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

I read Drop Dead Beautiful ~ Jackie Collins on holiday

and then started An Absolute Scandal ~ Penny Vincenzi which I'm still reading.

Image

User avatar
Really Loves Smeggy's
Posts: 2202
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 9:18 pm

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

Just finished Beating the Devil - the Making of Night of the Demon. Quite interesting but it could have done with a bit more depth. I was a bit like reading a long newspaper article rather than a book. Previous to that, Super Cannes by J G Ballard - an amazingly good writer IMO. I bought volume 1 of his collected short stories - maybe I'll read that next.

This has been a ThinBoy quality post

User avatar
Loves The place!
Posts: 743
Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:18 pm
Location: Another fine mess
How Hot Are You?: A Nice English Summer's Day

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

The Testement of Gideon Mack - James Robertson. Great book, but then it should be as the Fanatic was a brilliant book as well.

Thinboy - Have you read 'Shepperton Babylon' as you seem to be into movie books?




Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

Ive just ordered thefirst two Dexter books (based on the TV show)

I ve been wanting to read them for a while, but I ve been to broke to order them:D



noobywoobyscoobydooby
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:06 am

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

Bowker's cat wrote:The Testement of Gideon Mack - James Robertson. Great book, but then it should be as the Fanatic was a brilliant book as well.

Thinboy - Have you read 'Shepperton Babylon' as you seem to be into movie books?

Sounds interesting. Is it similar to Hollywood Babylon? I've read both volumes of that.

This has been a ThinBoy quality post

User avatar
Loves The place!
Posts: 743
Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:18 pm
Location: Another fine mess
How Hot Are You?: A Nice English Summer's Day

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

ThinBoy wrote:
Bowker's cat wrote:The Testement of Gideon Mack - James Robertson. Great book, but then it should be as the Fanatic was a brilliant book as well.

Thinboy - Have you read 'Shepperton Babylon' as you seem to be into movie books?

Sounds interesting. Is it similar to Hollywood Babylon? I've read both volumes of that.


The Independent's review. Must check out Hollywood Babylon, hope it comes up to James Ellroy's version.

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-enter ... 56253.html

Shepperton Babylon, by Matthew Sweet

Cocaine in Maidenhead, biscuits in Hove

By Roger Clarke
Wednesday, 9 March 2005

Before reading Matthew Sweet's history of "the lost worlds of British cinema", I never knew that 80 per cent of all British films made between 1901 and 1929 are forever consigned to oblivion. When the trailblazing producer Cecil Hepworth went bankrupt in 1924, his entire catalogue of negatives was melted down. The resin was used to waterproof new aircraft. "Next time you see a Spitfire in a museum," notes Sweet, "run your fingers over its skin... you might be touching a vanished masterpiece."

Perhaps nothing of worth was lost - though Sweet might beg to disagree. The title of his book is a comical reference to Kenneth Anger's Hollywood Babylon, whose bitchy and gossipy style he is happy to resonate - and far surpass in wit. But Sweet is in deadly earnest when it comes to countering the many calumnies he sees routinely and ignorantly re-stated against British film. He quotes with a shudder Truffaut's famous 1969 quote about the British being constitutionally unable to make great cinema, a stance since betrayed by a decade of Truffaut's countrymen copying Ken Loach.

Academics are no better. Sweet glumly quotes a film-studies prospectus (University of Dundee) that refers to British film as "a cottage industry stifled by prejudice". This is a view mirrored by left-leaning MPs who regard "Ealing Comedy" as a shorthand for insufferable Little Englandism.

In his labour of love, we follow Sweet as he visits run-down Hove flats, Buckinghamshire mansions and Southport old people's homes in search of reminiscence over cheap biscuits. It's a melancholy business, as he chats to forgotten actresses of the early talkies, famous producers who left the business to sell wicker furniture and bit-players who witnessed the debauchery of the 1930s. Why is he lurking round Maidenhead? To look for where the brightest stars of the 1920s snorted cocaine off the dance floor, of course.

He gives a memorable account of a visit to Norman Wisdom in the Isle of Man, a creepy business. In a series of brilliant thumbnail portraits, we learn of James Mason and his Baker Street ménage à trois, of Dirk Bogarde coming over toxic-gay in his leather pants, shooting The Singer Not the Song, and Kenneth More's first job on security at the Windmill Theatre, rooting out furtive masturbators in the audience.

Sweet's prose is deliciously barbed, as when he notes that "from the 1980s John Mills pursued that gentle whoring for which knighted actors assume they will be forgiven." He also makes some serious and scholarly arguments; for instance, that the quota system of 1927, far from damaging British film, created a nursery for later great works. But, on the whole, his task here is to entertain, and he does so with style. Shepperton Babylon is very well-informed and effortlessly funny. I doubt there will be a better film book this year.




Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

BC you've now read two books on my list that I haevnt managed yet ( but are sitting here waiting) - Calum's Road ( yeah still havent got round to it) and Gideon Mack.

It's coming yet for a' that, that Man to Man, the world o'er, shall brothers be for a' that. (Robert Burns)

User avatar
MILF
Posts: 11299
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:01 pm
Location: Always Argyll

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

Whirliegig wrote:BC you've now read two books on my list that I haevnt managed yet ( but are sitting here waiting) - Calum's Road ( yeah still havent got round to it) and Gideon Mack.


Both good uns. :)




Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

After reading some fantastic sounding reviews I bought The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society (think I've got that right!!) well I got half way through and completely lost interest.Damn shame as it was hardback and now I am cross with myself for wasting money.
Re reading Adrain Mole as I know he never lets me down

When I am an old woman I shall wear purple

User avatar
not so noobywooby
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2008 9:26 pm
Location: Somerset
How Hot Are You?: Siberia
Current Mood: generally confused

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

thats interesting - there's been a lot of hype about that book.

The title puts me off though - it too bandwagon, chosen by marketing department, ditzy , "Kite Flying in My Ukrainian Tractor in the Yemen" for me.

and The Mull Historical Society got there first. :thumb:

It's coming yet for a' that, that Man to Man, the world o'er, shall brothers be for a' that. (Robert Burns)

User avatar
MILF
Posts: 11299
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:01 pm
Location: Always Argyll

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

I'm reading two true crime books and listening to "the Night ferry" by Michael Robotham




Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

Engleby - Sebastian Faulks. God knows where it's going. :)




Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

I'm currently reading Double Cross by James Patterson - i like his Alex Cross series of books :)



PA to Jez Kyle
Posts: 6831
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2008 10:27 pm
How Hot Are You?: A Nice English Summer's Day
Current Mood: run down, fed up

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

Bowker's cat wrote:Engleby - Sebastian Faulks. God knows where it's going. :)


Got there. Well worth a read. :thumb:




Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

Well, I did start reading "The Three Coffins" by John Dickson Carr. He's not a very well known writer in Britain, but better known in America. He wrote mainly in the 1930s-1950s. His best known book is "The Hollow Man", but sayings it's his 'best known' doesn't mean that more than a couple of people have ever heard of it! Anyway, I found The Hollow Man in a second hand shop and read it some time ago and I loved it - a fiendishly clever locked-room murder mystery, which is JDC's speciality. I wanted to get some more of his books, and on the Internet people seemd to be raving about this one called The Three Coffins, so I sent off for it from America. It's been sitting on my bookshelf for a couple of years and I've been really looking forward to reading it but for some reason or another I never got round to it. But last week I eventually decided to start it. I was really enjoying it. In chapter one I thought "great; it's even got the some of the same characters in it that were in The Hollow Man!" In chapter two I started thinking "the plot is quite similar to The Hollow Man". In chapter three I was thinking "It's very similar... hmmm... wait a minute" and I got The Hollow Man down from the bookshelf and compared them, and it's the same bloody book, published under a different title!
:doh: I was so disappointed.
Anyway, to compensate for this devastating blow I sent off for a whole lot of his other books from Amazon Marketplace second-hand shops and I've started reading "The Nine Wrong Answers", which is great.

Of the ones of his that I've read I would recommend The Hollow Man (or The Three bloody Coffins), The Case of the Constant Suicides, The Plague Court Murders, The Judas Window and (my favourite so far) The Peacock Feather Murders. He also wrote as Carter Dickson - the last three in my list are Carter Dicksons.

There's a Wikipedia article -
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dickson_Carr
in which it says
Carr was a master of the locked room mystery, in which a detective solves apparently impossible crimes. Examples of such crimes are murder inside a locked and sealed room (where the only exit from the room is through the locked door -- which cannot be locked from outside the room), or the discovery of a dead body (strangled or knifed at close quarters) surrounded by snow or wet sand in which no footprints but the victim's are visible. The Dr. Fell mystery The Three Coffins (also known as The Hollow Man) (1935), usually considered Carr's masterpiece, features crimes that are variations on both of these scenarios and that has a notable discourse by Dr. Fell on the nature of impossible crimes. It was selected as the best locked-room mystery of all time by a panel of mystery writers and Dr. Fell's discourse is sometimes printed as a stand-alone essay.

I should have bloody well read it before buying The Three Coffins! I noticed from the article that The Peacock Feather Murders is also known as The Ten Teacups - I must remember not to order that one.

This has been a ThinBoy quality post

User avatar
Loves The place!
Posts: 743
Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:18 pm
Location: Another fine mess
How Hot Are You?: A Nice English Summer's Day

Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

ThinBoy wrote:I should have bloody well read it before buying The Three Coffins! I noticed from the article that The Peacock Feather Murders is also known as The Ten Teacups - I must remember not to order that one.


how odd. I've run across that before, only with films.

Just finishing The Tenderness Of Wolves - Steff Penney at the second attempt. I started it a few months ago but from the first few pages I though it was going to be Little House on the Prairie - Frozen North. not a bad read as it happened.




Top Forum Index Page New Posts

Posted on

      

TB, your story made me smile. :):

Last year I was looking for a good book for my dad who had just finished The Da Vinci Code (and surprised himself, by actually liking it )- so I wanted something similar, but different...and I found an author on Amazon and warnings by reviewers saying - these books are his old books reissued with different titles ...

In the end I got the Oxford Murders, which he absolutely loved. I'll get him the DVD for christmas .

It's coming yet for a' that, that Man to Man, the world o'er, shall brothers be for a' that. (Robert Burns)

User avatar
MILF
Posts: 11299
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:01 pm
Location: Always Argyll

PreviousNext

Return to Books

Similar topics

  • Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post
    Top of Page

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron